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11 Comments

  • mahesh Basavaraj

    Reply Reply February 8, 2017

    Thanks Ben. this is good stuff!

  • Marie Benard

    Reply Reply September 17, 2016

    Ben and Charlie! I bumped into one of my bosses today in my neighbourhood. I was on my way to physio, dressed in gym clothes, but I called out his name and said hello. He opened his arms a bit but it wasn’t clear if he was going to hug me or not, and with him being my boss and a rule about no non-work socializing with clients (he is both a boss and a client), I wasn’t sure what to do. I think I opened my arms a bit, and was friendly and bubbly as I usually am… but I’m kind of analyzing the situation and wondering if I should have just hugged him. I’m curious to know your thoughts. I ended the interaction before he did… I stopped him before he crossed the street, so we chatted while the light was red, but once the light changed again I said “your light’s changed, I’ll let you get on with your day” (I also didn’t want to be late for my appointment)

    thanks in advance for responding.

    • Charlie

      Reply Reply September 17, 2016

      I think a hug could have worked, especially since it appears he invited it. One of the big things that dictates a “work relationship” is the physical space. Outside of that space, especially in a random encounter like that, it wouldn’t have been a problem. You can even just call it out and say (after you hug) “I think we can greet with a hug outside of work, right? (smile)”

      Good news is that it isn’t a problem not to either. As long as you were friendly, you’re in good shape 🙂

      • Marie Benard

        Reply Reply September 25, 2016

        thanks, Charlie! That’s helpful. I often hug people but his motion wasn’t a clear invitation, it was sort of an open-arm motion that was still ambiguous in the moment. Knowing that the setting changes the relationship, I can feel more confident leading with a hug if I bump into him again 🙂 thank you

  • Anthony Walker

    Reply Reply May 14, 2015

    Ben,
    great job, I enjoyed the information. I have always struggled with the small chat with the Senior level executives and this has been huge help. I am fine, once I get started but sometimes the initial conversation starts out bumpy and not the image I want to leave for them. I have now started my own business and have to get out and in front of groups weekly to do this. Looking forward to more info from your company. Thanks!! TW

  • Burt Campbell

    Reply Reply May 14, 2015

    Nice! Great work Ben. Nailed it.

  • DJ Podgorny

    Reply Reply May 13, 2015

    Ben,

    This is really awesome stuff! Thanks for putting it together – I think there is a tremendous amount of value here.

    One question I have though is the following: what is the appropriate number of touch points in a month or year for these senior individuals? Obviously, there will be some that will work closely with you and interactions won’t have to be managed with as much detail, but for the people that you worked with in the past or are just in your network, how do you stay in touch and how often do you engage?

    • Ben Altman

      Reply Reply May 13, 2015

      Thanks DJ! Psyched to here it’s been valuable for you 🙂

      Your question on appropriate number of touch points is a good one, and unfortunately I don’t have a simple answer. It really depends on who the person is and what your past interactions have been.

      Obviously if you get invited out to a group lunch with a very senior partner or the CEO of your company, and then you start emailing that person twice a week based on that, it is likely to be seen as an overreach unless the emails are incredibly valuable or relevant.

      For people who I’ve worked with in the past or are just in my network, I will often use blog posts or news articles that I come across as the catalyst to reach out. So for instance, if I worked with someone in the past and through the course of conversation I learned that they have a certain passion or hobby, I will send them related things that I find online and use that to contact them. And in that same email I can ask them how they’ve been and/or send them a quick update on what I’ve been up to.

      This can often lead to a few back and forth emails that get you back on their radar.

      If it’s someone that I was particularly close with in the past, and ~6 months go by without us emailing, AND I don’t have a good catalyst reason to reach out, then I’ll email them with a general “Hey just checking in, how’s it been?” type email.

      But that ~6 months isn’t a magic number, and it depends on how close you two are, and what your cadence of interaction was when you were working together. If you used to send funny emails to each other every single day while working together, then it wouldn’t be inappropriate to reach out 4 weeks after your project ended with an email similar to the ones you were sending each other.

      Hope that makes sense!

  • Jan

    Reply Reply May 13, 2015

    I love this series! Especially because your explanations are very relatable.

    Awesome job Ben, I really appreciate it.

    • Ben Altman

      Reply Reply May 13, 2015

      Thanks Jan, appreciate the nice feedback! I try to illustrate as much as I can with stories because I think it helps crystalize things more than just speaking in theory.

      Glad to hear you liked it 🙂

  • Ivar Makadsi

    Reply Reply May 13, 2015

    Your work is very appreciated! 😀

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